Who Qualifies?

Applying for Supplemental Security Income can be a daunting task.  Some of the rules can be confusing and complicated.  Let one of our seasoned attorneys cut through the red tape and get you the answers you deserve.  We have provided a brief summary of who may be eligible for SSI benefits.  Contact us to set up a free benefits consultation to determine whether you are eligible.  

The Supplemental Security Income provides payment to an adult or child who are age 65 or older, blind, or disabled and has limited income and resources.  If your income and resources are too high, you will be turned down for benefits no matter how severe your medical disorders.  

Your income and resources

The social security administration looks at your income and resources to determine whether you are eligible for SSI.

Income

Income is money you receive such as wages, Social Security benefits and pensions. Income also includes such things as food and shelter. The amount of income you can receive each month and still get SSI depends partly on where you live. Social Security does not count all of your income when we decide whether you qualify for SSI. For example, we do not count:
  • The first $20 a month of most income you receive;
  • The first $65 a month you earn from working and half the amount over $65;
  • Food stamps;
  • Shelter you get from private nonprofit organizations; and
  • Most home energy assistance.


If you are married, we also include part of your spouse’s income and resources when deciding whether you qualify for SSI. If you are younger than age 18, we include part of your parents’ income and resources. And, if you are a sponsored noncitizen, we may include your sponsor’s income and resources.

If you are a student, some of the wages or scholarships you receive may not count.
If you are disabled but work, Social Security does not count wages you use to pay for items or services that help you to work. For example, if you need a wheelchair, the wages you use to pay for the wheelchair do not count as income when we decide whether you qualify for SSI.
Also, Social Security does not count any wages a blind person uses for work expenses. For example, if a blind person uses wages to pay for transportation to and from work, the wages used to pay the transportation cost are not counted as income.

If you are disabled or blind, some of the income you use (or save) for training or to buy things you need to work may not count.

Resources (things you own)

Resources that we count in deciding whether you qualify for SSI include real estate, bank accounts, cash, stocks and bonds.
You may be able to get SSI if your resources are worth no more than $2,000. A couple may be able to get SSI if they have resources worth no more than $3,000. If you own property that you are trying to sell, you may be able to get SSI while trying to sell it.
Social Security does not count everything you own in deciding whether you have too many resources to qualify for SSI. For example, we do not count:

  • The home you live in and the land it is on;
  • Life insurance policies with a face value of $1,500 or less;
  • Your car (usually);
  • Burial plots for you and members of your immediate family; and
  • Up to $1,500 in burial funds for you and up to $1,500 in burial funds for your spouse.

Contact us today and let us help you get the benefits you deserve.

Contact us today for your free consultation.

 
 




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